Kévin Perrot ; Thi Ha Duong Phan ; Trung Van Pham - On the set of Fixed Points of the Parallel Symmetric Sand Pile Model

dmtcs:2974 - Discrete Mathematics & Theoretical Computer Science, January 1, 2011, DMTCS Proceedings vol. AP, Automata 2011 - 17th International Workshop on Cellular Automata and Discrete Complex Systems - https://doi.org/10.46298/dmtcs.2974
On the set of Fixed Points of the Parallel Symmetric Sand Pile Model

Authors: Kévin Perrot ; Thi Ha Duong Phan ; Trung Van Pham

    Sand Pile Models are discrete dynamical systems emphasizing the phenomenon of $\textit{Self-Organized Criticality}$. From a configuration composed of a finite number of stacked grains, we apply on every possible positions (in parallel) two grain moving transition rules. The transition rules permit one grain to fall to its right or left (symmetric) neighboring column if the difference of height between those columns is larger than 2. The model is nondeterministic and grains always fall downward. We propose a study of the set of fixed points reachable in the Parallel Symmetric Sand Pile Model (PSSPM). Using a comparison with the Symmetric Sand Pile Model (SSPM) on which rules are applied once at each iteration, we get a continuity property. This property states that within PSSPM we can't reach every fixed points of SSPM, but a continuous subset according to the lexicographic order. Moreover we define a successor relation to browse exhaustively the sets of fixed points of those models.


    Volume: DMTCS Proceedings vol. AP, Automata 2011 - 17th International Workshop on Cellular Automata and Discrete Complex Systems
    Section: Proceedings
    Published on: January 1, 2011
    Imported on: January 31, 2017
    Keywords: Discrete Dynamical System,Sand Pile Model,Fixed point,[INFO.INFO-DM] Computer Science [cs]/Discrete Mathematics [cs.DM],[MATH.MATH-DS] Mathematics [math]/Dynamical Systems [math.DS],[NLIN.NLIN-CG] Nonlinear Sciences [physics]/Cellular Automata and Lattice Gases [nlin.CG],[MATH.MATH-CO] Mathematics [math]/Combinatorics [math.CO]

    4 Documents citing this article

    Share

    Consultation statistics

    This page has been seen 179 times.
    This article's PDF has been downloaded 295 times.