Vol. 20 no. 1


1. Monotone Simultaneous Paths Embeddings in $\mathbb{R}^d$

Bremner, David ; Devillers, Olivier ; Glisse, Marc ; Lazard, Sylvain ; Liotta, Giuseppe ; Mchedlidze, Tamara ; Moroz, Guillaume ; Whitesides, Sue ; Wismath, Stephen.
We study the following problem: Given $k$ paths that share the same vertex set, is there a simultaneous geometric embedding of these paths such that each individual drawing is monotone in some direction? We prove that for any dimension $d\geq 2$, there is a set of $d + 1$ paths that does not admit a monotone simultaneous geometric embedding.
Section: Discrete Algorithms

2. Graphs of Edge-Intersecting Non-Splitting Paths in a Tree: Representations of Holes-Part II

Boyacı, Arman ; Ekim, Tınaz ; Shalom, Mordechai ; Zaks, Shmuel.
Given a tree and a set P of non-trivial simple paths on it, VPT(P) is the VPT graph (i.e. the vertex intersection graph) of the paths P, and EPT(P) is the EPT graph (i.e. the edge intersection graph) of P. These graphs have been extensively studied in the literature. Given two (edge) intersecting paths in a graph, their split vertices is the set of vertices having degree at least 3 in their union. A pair of (edge) intersecting paths is termed non-splitting if they do not have split vertices (namely if their union is a path). We define the graph ENPT(P) of edge intersecting non-splitting paths of a tree, termed the ENPT graph, as the graph having a vertex for each path in P, and an edge between every pair of vertices representing two paths that are both edge-intersecting and non-splitting. A graph G is an ENPT graph if there is a tree T and a set of paths P of T such that G=ENPT(P), and we say that <T,P> is a representation of G. Our goal is to characterize the representation of […]
Section: Graph Theory

3. On Minimum Maximal Distance-k Matchings

Kartynnik, Yury ; Ryzhikov, Andrew.
We study the computational complexity of several problems connected with finding a maximal distance-$k$ matching of minimum cardinality or minimum weight in a given graph. We introduce the class of $k$-equimatchable graphs which is an edge analogue of $k$-equipackable graphs. We prove that the recognition of $k$-equimatchable graphs is co-NP-complete for any fixed $k \ge 2$. We provide a simple characterization for the class of strongly chordal graphs with equal $k$-packing and $k$-domination numbers. We also prove that for any fixed integer $\ell \ge 1$ the problem of finding a minimum weight maximal distance-$2\ell$ matching and the problem of finding a minimum weight $(2 \ell - 1)$-independent dominating set cannot be approximated in polynomial time in chordal graphs within a factor of $\delta \ln |V(G)|$ unless $\mathrm{P} = \mathrm{NP}$, where $\delta$ is a fixed constant (thereby improving the NP-hardness result of Chang for the independent domination case). Finally, we show the […]
Section: Graph Theory

4. A Variation on Chip-Firing: the diffusion game

Duffy, C. ; Lidbetter, T. F. ; Messinger, M. E. ; Nowakowski, R. J..
We introduce a natural variant of the parallel chip-firing game, called the diffusion game. Chips are initially assigned to vertices of a graph. At every step, all vertices simultaneously send one chip to each neighbour with fewer chips. As the dynamics of the parallel chip-firing game occur on a finite set the process is inherently periodic. However the diffusion game is not obviously periodic: even if $2|E(G)|$ chips are assigned to vertices of graph G, there may exist time steps where some vertices have a negative number of chips. We investigate the process, prove periodicity for a number of graph classes, and pose some questions for future research.
Section: Graph Theory

5. Hitting minors, subdivisions, and immersions in tournaments

Raymond, Jean-Florent.
The Erdős-P\'osa property relates parameters of covering and packing of combinatorial structures and has been mostly studied in the setting of undirected graphs. In this note, we use results of Chudnovsky, Fradkin, Kim, and Seymour to show that, for every directed graph $H$ (resp. strongly-connected directed graph $H$), the class of directed graphs that contain $H$ as a strong minor (resp. butterfly minor, topological minor) has the vertex-Erdős-P\'osa property in the class of tournaments. We also prove that if $H$ is a strongly-connected directed graph, the class of directed graphs containing $H$ as an immersion has the edge-Erdős-P\'osa property in the class of tournaments.
Section: Graph Theory

6. A Study of $k$-dipath Colourings of Oriented Graphs

Duffy, Christopher ; MacGillivray, Gary ; Sopena, Éric.
We examine $t$-colourings of oriented graphs in which, for a fixed integer $k \geq 1$, vertices joined by a directed path of length at most $k$ must be assigned different colours. A homomorphism model that extends the ideas of Sherk for the case $k=2$ is described. Dichotomy theorems for the complexity of the problem of deciding, for fixed $k$ and $t$, whether there exists such a $t$-colouring are proved.
Section: Graph Theory

7. Weak embeddings of posets to the Boolean lattice

Pálvölgyi, Dömötör.
The goal of this paper is to prove that several variants of deciding whether a poset can be (weakly) embedded into a small Boolean lattice, or to a few consecutive levels of a Boolean lattice, are NP-complete, answering a question of Griggs and of Patkos. As an equivalent reformulation of one of these problems, we also derive that it is NP-complete to decide whether a given graph can be embedded to the two middle levels of some hypercube.
Section: Graph Theory

8. Finding Hamilton cycles in random intersection graphs

Rybarczyk, Katarzyna.
The construction of the random intersection graph model is based on a random family of sets. Such structures, which are derived from intersections of sets, appear in a natural manner in many applications. In this article we study the problem of finding a Hamilton cycle in a random intersection graph. To this end we analyse a classical algorithm for finding Hamilton cycles in random graphs (algorithm HAM) and study its efficiency on graphs from a family of random intersection graphs (denoted here by G(n,m,p)). We prove that the threshold function for the property of HAM constructing a Hamilton cycle in G(n,m,p) is the same as the threshold function for the minimum degree at least two. Until now, known algorithms for finding Hamilton cycles in G(n,m,p) were designed to work in very small ranges of parameters and, unlike HAM, used the structure of the family of random sets.
Section: Graph Theory

9. Non-adaptive Group Testing on Graphs

Kameli, Hamid.
Grebinski and Kucherov (1998) and Alon et al. (2004-2005) study the problem of learning a hidden graph for some especial cases, such as hamiltonian cycle, cliques, stars, and matchings. This problem is motivated by problems in chemical reactions, molecular biology and genome sequencing. In this paper, we present a generalization of this problem. Precisely, we consider a graph G and a subgraph H of G and we assume that G contains exactly one defective subgraph isomorphic to H. The goal is to find the defective subgraph by testing whether an induced subgraph contains an edge of the defective subgraph, with the minimum number of tests. We present an upper bound for the number of tests to find the defective subgraph by using the symmetric and high probability variation of Lov\'asz Local Lemma.
Section: Combinatorics

10. On subtrees of the representation tree in rational base numeration systems

Akiyama, Shigeki ; Marsault, Victor ; Sakarovitch, Jacques.
Every rational number p/q defines a rational base numeration system in which every integer has a unique finite representation, up to leading zeroes. This work is a contribution to the study of the set of the representations of integers. This prefix-closed subset of the free monoid is naturally represented as a highly non-regular tree. Its nodes are the integers, its edges bear labels taken in {0,1,...,p-1}, and its subtrees are all distinct. We associate with each subtree (or with its root n) three infinite words. The bottom word of n is the lexicographically smallest word that is the label of a branch of the subtree. The top word of n is defined similarly. The span-word of n is the digitwise difference between the latter and the former. First, we show that the set of all the span-words is accepted by an infinite automaton whose underlying graph is essentially the same as the tree itself. Second, we study the function that computes for all n the bottom word associated with n+1 from […]
Section: Analysis of Algorithms

11. Growing and Destroying Catalan-Stanley Trees

Hackl, Benjamin ; Prodinger, Helmut.
Stanley lists the class of Dyck paths where all returns to the axis are of odd length as one of the many objects enumerated by (shifted) Catalan numbers. By the standard bijection in this context, these special Dyck paths correspond to a class of rooted plane trees, so-called Catalan-Stanley trees. This paper investigates a deterministic growth procedure for these trees by which any Catalan-Stanley tree can be grown from the tree of size one after some number of rounds; a parameter that will be referred to as the age of the tree. Asymptotic analyses are carried out for the age of a random Catalan-Stanley tree of given size as well as for the "speed" of the growth process by comparing the size of a given tree to the size of its ancestors.
Section: Analysis of Algorithms

12. Protected node profile of Tries

Javanian , Mehri.
In a rooted tree, protected nodes are neither leaves nor parents of any leaves. They have some practical motivations, e.g., in organizational schemes, security models and social-network models. Protected node profile measures the number of protected nodes with the same distance from the root in rooted trees. For no rooted tree, protected node profile has been investigated so far. Here, we present the asymptotic expectations, variances, covariance and limiting bivariate distribution of protected node profile and non-protected internal node profile in random tries, an important data structure on words in computer science. Also we investigate the fraction of these expectations asymptotically. These results are derived by the methods of analytic combinatorics such as generating functions, Mellin transform, Poissonization and depoissonization, saddle point method and singularity analysis.
Section: Analysis of Algorithms